Hovenweep National Monument

Hovenweep National Monument is considered our sister park is located in Colorado.  Hovenweep (a Ute Indian word meaning “deserted valley”) contains six groups of prehistoric Anasazi Indian Ruins circa A.D. 400-1300. These include the remains of coursed-stone masonry pueblos, small cliff dwellings, and large quantities of scattered ruins.

The drive there was pleasant, we passed many cows grazing in open ranges and prairie dogs which I had never seen (the prairie dogs, not the cows).

Utah countryside

 The staff warmly greeted us and instructed us on how to get around the park.  The park itself was small.  A group of weather beaten stone structures cloistered around a small canyon where the ancient Puebloan people dwelled.

Ranger Jonathan on Patrol

The most impressive feature of the Hovenweep ruins are the amazing towers – square, oval, circular, and D-shaped. Many of the ruins resemble castles.

Castle Ruin

Finally, we visited off site The Cajon Group consisting of a small village.  The surviving structures are situated at the head of a small canyon, and evidence indicates that 80 to 100 people may have lived there.

On the way home we encountered more live stocks including a flock of sheep.  Jonathan got out of the car to pet the sheep but two sheep dogs circled the car protecting the flock.

Sheep dogs charging to maul Jonathan

It was wonderful to see this park but we were happy to return to Natural Bridges and our friendly co workers.

 

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About Trish

Patricia is an avid photographer and a former National Park Ranger in the Southwest and East Coast. She is also a succesful health coach and speaker. Her website is www.finallyfitandhealthy.com
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6 Responses to Hovenweep National Monument

  1. Yvette Donahue says:

    Well those sheep dogs were doing their duty. Pretty amazing. I’ve seen sheep dog hearding their sheep at the Deerfield Fair once. Fascinating.

  2. Ann says:

    I love those old ruins. The Anasazi people disappeared, but supposedly a lot of their traditions are still alive in the Hopi people. I’m sorry about the sheep dogs going after Jonathan. But I guess that’s one way to keep sheep from being stolen. I hope you are having a good time, Trish.

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